View on collections from our Exhibits Intern

by TeAnna, Exhibits Intern

Clothing is a miraculous thing. For centuries, people from all from all regions, all socioeconomic statuses, utilized clothing and fashion as a way to tell their story. Whether it was simple, practical outfits for the working class, or fashionable, ritzy clothing belonging to the upper class, we can better understand the social history of the people who wore these clothes.

Fortunately, the WHC archives have many articles of clothing that were generously donated. Some have connections back to significant figures in Oregon history, while some Continue reading

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October 31, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The headlines and news, and opinion from The Daily Capital Journal:

LOSSES HAVE MADE GERMAN SOLDIERS LOSE HEART IN WAR

Paris, Oct. 31. – Unless the allies meet some unexpected reverse, the seat of the French government will be re-transferred from Bordeaux to Paris November 20, it was stated here today on unofficial but reliable authority.

By that a date, it was predicted by General Galleni’s aides, the Germans would have been compelled entirely to evacuate French territory.

Messages from the front were to the effect that the kaiser’s troops have nowhere succeeded in resuming the offensive and that the allies were in many places occupying the trenches which the Germans held a week ago.

**** Continue reading

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October 30, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The headlines and news, and opinion from The Daily Capital Journal:

TURK’S BATTLESHIP BOMBARDS RUSSIAN PORT ON BLACK SEA

Russian officialdom was not alarmed, but rejoiced, today at news that Turkey has finally become a participant in the European war.

Turkey’s decision to enter the war would result in the end of the Ottoman Empire, and the eventual partition of the Middle East among the victors in a disastrous series of agreements that would haunt the remainder of the Twentieth Century and lead inexorably to 9-11, the invasion of Iraq, and the ongoing problems in that part of the world. Continue reading

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October 29, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

In the eyes of many, the assassination of the Archduke Ferdinand set in motion the events that led to war. Readers of the Statesman saw the following in their edition of the October 29, 1914:

Oregon Statesman 29 October 1914In the previous day’s edition, the editor published the following editorial, entitled “That Bosnian Lynching Bee: Continue reading

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October 28, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Locally the eight-hour day prompted the Oregon Statesman to publish the following political cartoon on its front page:

October 28, 1914 Oregon Statesman

Editorially, the paper commented on the call by a Massachusetts Congressman for an inquiry into Uncle Sam’s military preparedness: Continue reading

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October 27, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

As the First Battle of Ypres progressed, the headlines reflected the struggle:

FIGHT AT THE YSER FIERCEST OF WAR, RAGING ALL NIGHT
West Bank of River Is a Veritable Inferno – Fight Grows In Fierceness
HEAVENS LIT UP BY BURSTING SHELLS
Great Searchlights Aid “Night Shifts” – Sky Filled With Aeroplanes Continue reading

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October 26, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Cover, Saturday Evening Post, Oct 24, 1914

On the editorial page of the Daily Capital Journal, the editor comments on the cover illustration for the October 24th edition of the Saturday Evening Post:

The Saturday Evening Post seems to have been selected by the warring nations as the medium through which each of them will present its case to the world. While each has used its greatest leaders to prepare the copy for the American printer and public, an American artist, Leyendecker, has told the most graphic and probably the most truthful story of them all on the front page of the October 24 number. It is a picture composed of three subjects: A woman, a little girl and a Red Cross letter. Simple in detail, it is one of the most affecting pictures seen in any American magazine or anywhere else in years. He is indeed an artist who can tell so much with a few strokes of his brush. There is no use trying to tell of it, it has to be seen, but it surely is worth laying away as a memento of the greatest and wickedest war the world as never known.

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