August 28, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The German breakthrough threatens the French and British forces, while in the east, Russia is seen as “Paris’ Main Hope”:

GERMANS ADVANCE IN FORCE

BELGIAN STORY OF DESTROYING LOUVAIN
Burning of City With Its Priceless
Treasures An Act of Wanton Vandalism
and Absolutely Unprovoked Continue reading

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August 27, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The headlines speak to the growing fears of the war. In the west, Paris prepares for a siege as German armies cross into France, and as casualties mount. In the east, Russia seems confident that Berlin will fall within weeks.

“ALLIES ARE VERY MUCH ALARMED” reads the headline. ”The allies plainly are alarmed today by developments on the Franco-Belgian frontier,” so concerned that the war offices withheld their usual daily statements about the progress of the fighting. Allied losses were described as “staggering” and it was reported that the French and British had lost 70,000 men killed, wounded, or captured.

“Nothing New From War At Coos Bay” followed up on an earlier story of rumors of a naval battle off the Oregon coast:

Although nothing indicating that a naval battle was in progress off Coos Bay was heard early today, verification of heavy firing yesterday afternoon apparently by warships reaching here from all along the southwest Oregon coast.

It was impossible to ascertain whether or not a naval engagement had taken place, and no wreckage was being washed ashore, but hundreds of citizens of this section, who heard the firing were positive that it was that of cannon.

The sea was overcast with fog today. If there were foreign war vessels in the offing, they could not be seen.

In Washington, Secretary of State Bryan urged Americans to leave Europe as speedily as possible. “‘War has its uncertainties,’ said Secretary Bryan, ‘and it is not advisable for Americans to stay longer in Europe.’”

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26 August 2014

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

CORPSES HEAPED IN WINDROWS
Germans Charge in Face of Hurricane of Shrapnel and Rifle Balls
THEIR RECKLESSNESS FAIRLY INCREDIBLE
Terrific Fighting Raged All Day and Slaughter Was Simply Appalling

Paris, Aug. 26. – Terrific fighting raged today all along France’s eastern frontier. It was heaviest at Meubeuge, Givet, Montmedy and just west of Luneville. The slaughter was frightful, the general staff reported.

The German crown prince was said to be in command of the kaiser’s soldiers.

They were charging desperately in the face of a hurricane of shrapnel and rifle balls.

In places their corpses were piled breast high.

Continue reading

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August 25, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Prohibition was the local issue. The editor, acknowledging that closing taverns and saloons adversely affected the local economy, and that the economic downturn affecting the entire country, slowed economic growth, nonetheless was optimistic about Salem’s future.

SALEM AND ITS FUTURE
SALEM has been quiet this year because it has been a quiet year throughout the country. Many Pacific coast towns especially have expanded so rapidly during the past five years that it is but natural that they should slow down and await the further growth and development of the territory from which they derive their trade and business. Salem is one of these communities which is taking a little breathing spell, as it were.

We have suffered somewhat, also, from the readjustment made necessary by the closing of the saloons, a condition which came in at a most inopportune time, and which can be minimized if all the people will put the interests of the community ahead of all else, and accept the verdict of the majority vote as all good Americans should. Continue reading

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August 24, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The headlines continue to report the growing magnitude of war rapidly becoming worldwide:

FIGHT MAY CONTINUE FOR DAYS
Advantage Seems to Be With Germans But Not at All Points
TRY TO HOLD GERMANS UNTIL RUSSIA STRIKES

SAYS JAPAN WILL BE SUPREME ON PACIFIC

MILLION OF CZAR’S TROOPS SWEEPING EASTERN PRUSSIA
Brush Austrians Aside and Overwhelm Germans by Force of Numbers

BURNED VILLAGES STARVED REFUGEES DESOLATE, RUINS

AUSTRIA WHIPPED TO STANDSTILL BY LITTLE SERVIA
Austrian Soldiers Have All Been Withdrawn From the Servian Territory

GREATEST SCRAP IN HISTORY

“The French and British were holding back the entire German army today. The fighting was desperate; the Losses appalling. . . . The fighting line was like a “Z” from Audenarde to Continue reading

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August 22, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

With the outbreak of war and bold headlines dominating the pages, the paper’s font changed to a bolder style.

READY TO STRIKE IF ULTIMATUM IS NOT COMPLIED WITH
Time Given Germany to Answer Expires at 7 O’clock This Evening
NOT PROBABLE KAISER WILL YIELD TO MIKADO
Germany Handicapped But Is Certain Not to Forget the Matter

Japan, an ally of Great Britain offered to assist Britain if it could seize Germany’s Pacific colonies. Early in August, Britain sought Japanese assistance in destroying German naval resources in East Asia. Within months, Japanese forces occupied German leased territories and islands in the Pacific and China. Japan launched the first ship-based air raids at this time. Continue reading

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August 21, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The headlines from Europe describe the rapid start to the war as each side maneuvered for advantage:

LEAVE BELGIANS DESTITUTE, HUNGRY AND SHELTERLESS
Such Is the Condition of Those Left in Territory Taken by the Germans
ALL FOOD IS SEIZED AND HOUSES BURNED
Belgian Government Unable to Help Them, Though Doing All It Can Continue reading

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