August 1, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

From The Daily Capital Journal:

THE GREATEST WAR IN WORLD’S HISTORY SEEMS INEVITABLE

History’s greatest war seemed all but inevitable in Europe today.

Germany had served ultimatums on Russia and France.

The former demanded a cessation of Russia’s mobilization.

The latter asked France what its attitude would be if Germany and Russia went to war.

Russia’s mobilization was only hastened; Russo-German diplomatic relations were broken, and Germany’s ambassador to Russia was reported returning home.

France answered that it ”must consult its own interests at this time,” and then ordered its army and navy mobilized.

It was expected the German ambassador in Paris would demand his passports tonight.

England notified France that it would co-operate with the latter.

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July 31, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Capital Journal Headlines:

Russia Mobilizes Her Entire Army Forcing Germany

London Exchange Closes First Time

London Sees Little Prospect of Peace Ready For Worst

As the belligerents prepared for war, shipping slowed nearly to a halt. The German government ordered merchant ships held in port for possible conversion to naval purposes. As Canada prepared to send troops to England, Canadian liners were requisitioned for troop transport. In New York, Hamburg-American vessels were held in port or recalled by wireless. Continue reading

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July 30, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Capital Journal Headlines:

Italian Feeling Against Austria Becoming Intense
Compact Which Binds Germany, Austria and Italy an Unnatural One
Italy Is Austria’s Traditional Enemy

While France . . . Is Firm Friend

With 200,000 Men and 500 Airships France Is Ready

Germany’s Action Depends On Russia Ultimatum Is Sent

Austrians Beaten In First Battle With Heavy Losses

The War Begins in Los Angeles: “Two men are near death today as the result of a riot Continue reading

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July 29, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Once the dominos began to fall readers had difficulty keeping up with the news. The Capital Journal reported “The Days Doings In Europe Told In Brief Paragraphs: Continue reading

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July 28, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

“Austro-Servian War Declared and Europe Trembles” read Tuesday’s headline. Austria had declared war on Serbia, rejecting British appeals for mediation, but conceding that they were open to keeping the conflict local. Fears of a wider war hinged on the response of Germany to its ally, Austria, and Russia’s toward its ally, Serbia. Russia was reported mobilizing troops and moving them toward the Serbian border. The German emperor’s son, the crown prince, was reported to have been ordered to stay out of Berlin by his father for fear that his hot headedness would plunge Germany into a war his father sought to avoid.

Editorially the Statesman wrote:

Germany and England may succeed in averting a general European war; but the danger of such a bloody conflict is great. Austria proposes to invade Servia, and if she does this Russia will without doubt come to the rescue of the Servian government, as will some of the neighboring states. The complications that would follow might involve all Europe in the greatest armed conflict of all history. The whole of Europe is an armed camp. The nations are trained and equipped for war, to their exhaustion, and the grudges of hundreds and thousands of years are kept alive constantly. The whole spectacle is a disgrace to civilization.

Locally, the paper reported that “declaration of war between Serbia and Austria today aroused the patriotism in Portland of both races to a high pitch, and hundreds are ready to Continue reading

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July 27, 1914

By Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The Journal’s headlines reported troubles from Ireland to the Balkans:

ULSTERITES CLASH
WITH KING’S TROOPS
CATHOLICS EXCITED
Ten Thousand Rifles and a Quantity of Ammunition
Landed from Yacht
FOUR KILLED WHEN SOLDIERS CHARGE
Many Wounded Among Them
Several Women and Children One Woman Killed

The threat of civil war in Ireland resulting from Parliament’s consideration Irish home rule threatened Britain’s capability of meeting its obligations should war break out in Europe. Continue reading

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July 26, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

No edition of the Capital Journal was published on the 26th. In Europe, events continue toward war. Continue reading

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