November 23, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

From the Monday edition of The Daily Capital Journal:

RUSSIANS CLAIM GREAT VICTORY ON BANKS OF VISTULA
Say Kaiser’s Advance Checked and Twelve Thousand Prisoners Taken
ANOTHER BLOODY BATTLE IS RAGING
Also Claim Situation in East Prussia Is Improved by Swamps Freezing

BLAME GOVERNMENT FOR CENSORSHIP
Much Complaint in England Over Censorship, Navy Management and Tax

THINK THE KAISER PERFECTING PLANS TO INVADE ENGLAND
Moving of Entire Belgian Population from Coast Awakens Suspicion
GERMAN WARSHIPS GET READY FOR SEA
These and Other Things Mean Either Invasion or a Big Naval Battle

GERMAN ADVANCE REACHES CRITICAL STAGE OF JOURNEY
Danger of Being Flanked Is Imminent but Position Must Be Held
IF ARMY IS FLANKED DISASTER IS CERTAIN
Safety of Army Depends Largely on Incompetence of Russian Generals

On the editorial page the lead editorial discusses how the Deity seems to be on the side of each belligerent:

GOD IN THE WAR Continue reading

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November 21, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Saturday was a light news day for the Daily Capital Journal. News of the day focused on the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday and the paper had its weekend agricultural supplement:

BLOODIEST FIGHTING OF WAR IS REPORTED IN RUSSIAN POLAND

ALLIES HAD BEST OF DAY’S FIGHTING Continue reading

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November 20, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The volume of war news on the front page of the Daily Capital Journal was limited to three articles:

GERMAN OFFICIALS ARE CONFIDENT OF VICTORIES IN EAST
Fighting Has Not Yet Reached Decisive Stage – Situation Satisfactory
THOUSANDS POURING ACROSS THE FRONTIER
Slavs Driven Back in Russian Poland But Are Fighting Desperately

TYPHUS ATTACKS FIVE THOUSAND IN LAST FIVE DAYS
Conditions Ideal for Spread of Epidemic and Situation Is Grave
TROOPS OF ALLIES SO FAR HAVE ESCAPED
Physicians Predict It Is Certain to Spread through All the Armies Continue reading

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November 19, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Of absolutely no connection with war is the following story of a “properly robed lady in black” floating down Commercial Street:

STREET CAR CREW DISCOVERS A GHOST

Salem Water Company facilities on the east side of Commercial Street south of the intersection with Trade Street. Salem Public Library Historic Photograph Collections, Salem Public Library, Salem, Oregon.

Lady Properly Robed in Black Floats Down the Street with the Car

While European countries boast of relics and ruins of interest to tourists, and California has already began a campaign for “seeing America first” Salem may lay come claim to fame for its “Haunted Bridge.” Few cities in the United States can boast of a real ghost at large, and no slow creepy ghost at that, but one that can keep up with a street car. Neither is the Salem phantom a filmy white spook, but is barged in substantial black, and all of the above facts are authentic, according to Conductor F. A. Robertson, of the Portland, Eugene & Eastern, and his testimony is substantiated by that of A. E. Atherton, the motorman.

It appears that at about 8 o’clock last night the two men were returning from the run out to the end of South Commercial street when they flushed the ghost at the top of the hill before coming down to the bridge across South Mill street. Mr. Robertson says it was a woman, that’s way [sic] he is willing to believe anything of it. She was dressed in black and kept her body rigid floating long clear of the ground some four or five feet.

Continue reading

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November 18, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

From the pages of the Daily Capital Journal:

MILITARY MAN WANTS MUCH LARGER ARMY
Chief of Staff, General Wotherspoon, Would Have An Army of 200,000

RUSSIA IS GETTING SORE AT THE ALLIES; MAY TURN ON TURKS
Slav Leaders Openly Complain that Allies Do Not Drive Germans Back
CZAR MAY ABANDON “ON TO BERLIN” PLAN
Successes of Turks Will Compel Greater Efforts Against Them On Russia’s Part

ENGLAND’S INCOME TAX IS 8 PER CENT
It Is Expected It Will Be Advanced to 25 Per Cent Before End of War

GIGANTIC BATTLE BETWEEN GERMANS AND RUSSIANS IS ON
Germans Take Offensive In Poland and Meet With Fierce Resistance
FORCES ON EACH SIDE SAID TO BE ENORMOUS
Reinforcements Rushed and Number of Men in Fight Is Now Millions Continue reading

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Prest. C.C. Poling, 2009.058.0141

20090580141Willamette Heritage Center Collections, 2009.058.0141

Dallas College was a school affiliated with the United Evangelical Church that operated in Continue reading

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November 17, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

From the pages of the Daily Capital Journal:

A single headline and its accompanying reportage relates what the war had become after three and a half months of fighting:

CONDITIONS WORST SINCE WAR BEGAN; SUFFERING INTENSE
Trenches Are Flooded Over Their Tops and Great Numbers Drown
ELECTRIC CURRENT TURNED OFF WIRES
Little Groups Huddled On Islets and Helpless Killed by Artillery Fire Continue reading

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