March 31, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The Oregon Statesman reported that the “Saloon Is Not For The Women,” providing an interesting twist on equal rights:

SALOON IS NOT FOR THE WOMEN
Law Pronging Females Frequenting such Places Declared Not Unconstitutional By Supreme Court Decision Rendered Yesterday. Continue reading

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March 30, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Minimum wage is often an issue in American politics. Here is how the Capital Journal addressed the issue in a short editorial:

Australia, from which land come the patter for the ballot we now have as well as a good many other ideas that are common, has extended minimum wage legislation from six trades in 1896 to a hundred and forty-one trades today. That would seem to indicate that there must be something in it after all. It sometimes becomes necessary to compel some fellows to do at least so much in the way of doing unto others as he would be done by. If they can be forced to fifty percent of the gold rule conduct it’s something accomplished.

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March 29, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The editorial in the Capital Journal for the 29th raised a question of the bystander’s (Samaritan?) responsibility to come to the aid of others. Though this blog post relates to events current 100 years ago, it was written as this country struggles to develop a coherent response to the ebola crisis: Continue reading

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March 27, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The editorial in the Saturday edition of the Capital Journal comments upon the apartments under construction on Court Street:

The new apartment house on Court street being erected by Messrs. Rogers and McNary is a modern improvement and will be an ornament to that beautiful street, opposite Salem’s attractive park blocks. It is worthy of note because it illustrates the faith these gentlemen have in the city and its future. Mr. Rogers last year erected one of the best business blocks in Salem, disregarding the prevailing business depression, and it is still going ahead investing his money in Capital city improvements. This is the kind of boosting which builds up communities by inspiring confidence and setting an example to other property owners to invest their money here and pin their faith to their home town.

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March 26, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The Capital Journal reported the loss of a U.S. submarine:

U.S. SUBMARINE F-4 DIVES TO ITS DOOM WITH ENTIRE CREW

American Under Sea Boat Goes Down In Practice Maneuvers At Honolulu and Fails To Rise To Surface With Its Crew of 25 Men – All Hope of Saving Entombed Sailors Given Up – Oil Floats To Surface Near Harbor Continue reading

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March 25, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The Capital Journal headline reported how American industry and technology supported the war effort to our profit:

WRIGHT TURNS OUT MANY AIRSHIPS FOR WARRING NATIONS
Factories Working Night and Day to Supply Demand for War Aeroplanes
ARMORED CRAFTED NEEDED BY BY ARMY AVIATORS
Fate of Machines Does Not Worry Maker – Product Shipped From Dayton Continue reading

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Quick History of The Ram

The Ram Pub, April 1974.  Salem Area Chamber of Commerce Collection, Willamette Heritage Center, 1998.013.0189.

The Ram Pub, April 1974. Salem Area Chamber of Commerce Collection, Willamette Heritage Center, 1998.013.0189.

The Ram Restaurant and Brewery, located today at 515 12th St SE in Salem has been a gathering place since about 1940, when then proprietors Walter Goughnour and Merle E. Pruett converted their auto service station into a “gas station and beer parlour.”  Here’s a Continue reading

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