July 5, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The circumstances surrounding the attempt on J.P. Morgan’s life became more confusing as the identify of the shooter also came to be questioned:

CHARGE OF MURDER MAY BE ADDED TO MISDEEDS OF HOLT
Man Who Shot Morgan Believed To Be Eric Muenster Wanted For Murder
CHARGED WITH POISONING WIFE WITH ARSENIC
Holt Denies He Is Wanted – Relatives Not Sure of Identity

The paper reported the police as using what we now call “enhanced interrogation:”

At the county jail in Mineola Police commissioner Woods and Captain Tunney of the “anarchist squad” of the New York police were still sweating Holt today. They are not yet satisfied that he did not have an accomplice in his attack upon Morgan as well as Continue reading

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July 3, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Image Source: Library of Congress

Domestic terror is not a 21st Century phenomena. The front page of the Capital Journal reported an anti-war protestor exploding a bomb at the national capital:

BOMB EXPLODED IN NATIONAL CAPITAL BY PEACE FANATIC
Letter Sent To Newspaper Announces Blast To Be Set Off In Capitol
WE STAND FOR PEACE YET SELL WAR MATERIAL
Perpetrator Says He Is Not A German But An Old Fashioned American Continue reading

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Army Blanket Report, 1943

Army Blanket Record, Thomas Kay Woolen Mill, 1943.  WHC Collections M3 1966-001-0001 box 58, folder 3.

Army Blanket Record, Thomas Kay Woolen Mill, 1943. WHC Collections M3 1966-001-0001 box 58, Folder 3.

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June 30, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Our chronicle has taken us through the first year of the war and the signal event that triggered the nations going to war in August. Those who have followed this chronicle by following the links to the relevant issues of the Capital Journal may have noted how the papers became deadened to the conflict.

As journalists, the papers sought to report the events. They quickly found out that blind reporting turned them into mere mouthpieces for agendas having nothing to do with providing the necessary information so that readers could form equally informed opinions. By and large, the Salem papers maintained a Continue reading

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June 29, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Peace Will Come Only When Men Are Worn Out” read the headline in the Capital Journal. The article describes the futility (or the stubbornness) of pouring over a hundred thousand shells a day into one sector of the battlefield for going on six weeks:

The Germans are defending the front north of Arras which the French have been attacking for the past six weeks. It is estimated that an average of 100,000 shells have been fired daily near Continue reading

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June 26, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

In a classic example of the logical fallacy of tu quoque the headline in the Capital Journal read “Germans Defend Use of Gas Bombs – Say Allies Set Example:”

Berlin, via Wireless to Sayville, June 26. – Defending the use of asphyxiating gas bombs, a government statement today pointed out that the French and British used gas shells for moths before the Germans resorted to such a weapon. The aim of the Germans, Continue reading

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June 25, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The headlines in the Capital Journal addressed American grievances against England and Germany, cheating at the Naval Academy and the use of gas on the western front:

ENGLAND’S ANSWER EVADES ISSUE OF AMERICAN PROTEST
Secretary Lansing Will Prepare Rejoiner to British Note
CLAIMS PRIZE COURTS HAVE HASTENED ACTION
British Deny Having Harmed American Shipping On High Seas

PLEBS FORCED TO CHEAT BY HAZERS AT NAVAL ACADEMY
Midshipman Says Upperclassmen Compelled New Men To Steal Questions

ITALIANS CAPTURE AUSTRIAN FORTRESS NEAR MALBORGET Continue reading

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