August 31, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

On 19 August 1915 a German U-boat sank the British White Star liner Arabic, outward bound for the USA. The Arabic was zigzagging at the time, and the and the German commander thought she was trying to ram the submarine. In response, he fired a single torpedo which struck the liner and she sank within 10 minutes, killing 44 passengers and crew, 3 of whom were American. In response the White House issued a statement to the effect that the Administration was speculating on what to do if the Arabic investigation indicated that there had been a deliberate German attack. If true, there was possible that the US Continue reading

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August 29, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

A short editorial addresses the penalty for sedition:

THE PENALTY FOR SEDITION

Touching the question whether seditious propaganda may be carried on with impunity against the foreign policies of the United States, this federal statute may be of interest. Section 5 of the Acts of March 4, 1907, concerning criminal correspondence Continue reading

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August 27, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Teddy has put his foot into it, according to the headline in the Oregon Statesman:

IT SEEMS TEDDY PUT HIS FOOT INTO IT
Criticism of President in the Colonel’s Speech Stirs Up Hornet’s Nest
GARRISON RIPS UP WOOD
Secretary Says T.R. Should Have Been Muffled
Being Informed of Rumpus, Roosevelt Issues Statement Saying Continue reading

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August 26, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

Continuing his criticism of the President, former President Theodore Roosevelt is quoted in today’s Oregon Statesman:

TEDDY IS STILL SPOILING TO MIX IT WITH KAISER
“United States Has Played an Ignoble Part Among Nations,” He Says
WILSON ALSO GETS HIS
Theodore Not Satisfied With Woodrow’s Tactics

“I Agree That We must stand by the president,: says San Juan hero, and adds, “so long as the president stands by the country” – Pacifists roasted

Plattsburg, N.Y., Aug. 25. – More than 3000 persons, including 1200 members of the military instruction camp, burst into wild and prolonged applause here tonight, when, in the cour of an address on military preparedness, Theodore Roosevelt, former Continue reading

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August 25, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The Oregon Statesman reported the tragic death of an Italian worker, killed by an oncoming train at Perkins Crossing:

ENGINE KILLS ITALIAN COOK
Dreaming of Sunny Italy, Joe Jermerosta Is Hurled Into Eternity
Southern Pacific Camp at Perkins Crossing Is Cast Into Gloom by Death of Fellow Countryman On Sunday

(By Ella McMunn)

Quinaby, Aug. 24. – Finishing his work Sunday night at 10 o’clock, Joe Jermerosta, aged 47, the cook for the camp of Italian laborers at Perkins crossing on the Southern Pacific, sat for a moment on the raised grade of the track and dozed fatally, an onrushing southbound train striking him, fairly in the back, killing him instantly. There are thirty-five men in the crew, who have been engaged in raising the track between Salem and Continue reading

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August 17, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The banner headline across the Capital Journal read:

FRANK LYNCHED AT BIRTHPLACE OF MARY PHAGAN
DRAGGED BY MOB FROM PRISON CELL
Famous Convicted Murderer of Georgia Pays Penalty at Hands of Mob – Spirited Away To the Town Where His Alleged Victim Is Buried Frank’s Body Is Found Hanging To Tree By Roadside, a Ghastly Sight – Mother Thanks God His Sufferings Are Over

Marietta, Ga., Aug. 17. – The body of Leo M. Frank was found hanging to a tree about two miles east of Marietta today. The famous prisoner was lynched by the automobile party of kidnapers who appeared at the state prison at Milledgeville last night, overpowered Continue reading

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August 16, 1915

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The Capital Journal reported the response of the the United States to Austria-Hungary on the issue of commerce in munitions and neutrality:

UNITED STATES STRICTLY NEUTRAL, SECRETARY LANSING TELLS AUSTRIA

Washington, Aug. 16. – The Teutonic allies cannot expect to disrupt commerce and industry and produce economic confusion through appeals to neutral powers because Britain rules the seas. Continue reading

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