November 7, 1914

by Richard van Pelt, WWI Correspondent

The city was still digesting the results of Tuesday’s election. The major changes included an overwhelmingly Republican legislature and the election of the first woman to that body:

The distinction of being the first woman ever to be elected to a seat in the Oregon legislature today belongs to Miss Marian Towne, of Talent, Jackson county. Miss Towne is a democrat, and was chosen to be a member of the house.

The net state legislature will be overwhelmingly republican. There will probably be 28 republicans and two democrats in the senate, and 57 republicans, two democrats and one independent in the house.

In the Oregon Statesman the paper reported on the “School of Electric Economics” which reported this about food and mood:

[Mrs. Redington] declared that she believes much of the irritability and immorality of people arises from the poorly balanced meals prepared for them by the cook. She said: “If your husband is cross, change his diet; if your child quarrels, give it a milder diet; if you feel blue or discouraged, eat something; if your stomach is bad, quit eating, and live on a buttermilk diet, and you’ll be a new woman. If you are feeling ’old,’ drink sour milk, it kills old age germs, say the doctors.”

An advertisement offering for sale “A fresh cow; good milker” gives a sense of Salem’s size in 1914. The seller’s address: 771 North Commercial.

The news and headlines from The Daily Capital Journal:

THREE BIG RUSSIAN ARMIES ON WAY TO GERMAN CAPITAL
Storm and Extreme Cold Cause Intense Suffering Among Kaiser’s Troops
WOLVES FEED ON DEAD AND KILL WOUNDED
Germans Burn Villages As They Retreat – Villagers Suffer Greatly

HOT BOMBARDMENT OF ALLIES POSITION BEGAN AT DAY BREAK
Kaiser Realizes He Must Win Quickly Or Retreat to Own Country
OTHER CANNON DUELS SEEM BUT CHILD’S PLAY
Kaiser in Command Stimulates His Troops To Redouble Efforts

GERMAN OFFICERS SHOOT OWN SOLDIERS

London, Nov. 6 – For giving ground on the battlefield, no matter how murderous the enemy’s fire, German soldiers are frequently killed by their own officers, according to the account of one of their own number who fell, wounded, into the allies’ hands, as published among the British war office’s “eye witness” stories today.

“Our officers warned us,” this prisoner was quoted as telling the surgeon who attended him, “that if we faltered, we would be shot from behind, and I know this threat was fulfilled when our terrible losses compelled us to retire. I myself was wounded by a German bullet.”

The same “eye witness” story spoke admiringly of the Germans’ steady advance despite the fearful execution wrought among them by the allies’ volleys and of their refusal to retreat even when their ranks were riddled by the hailstorm of lead they faced.

The statement was made that the kaiser had determined to capture Ypres before October 1, an undertaking in which he failed.

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About whclarc

We are devoted to providing information fresh from the Archives, Library and Collections of the Willamette Heritage Center in Salem, Oregon. We specialize in the history of Marion County and the greater Salem area.
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